Tom Brady would 'definitely' consider playing past 45, but will need to be fully committed

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Gutfeld previews the big game between the Chiefs and Buccaneers

Tom Brady vs. Father Time will be the biggest rivalry in the NFL going forward.

Brady had been very open in the past about when he thinks he can play until and has said he would like to play until he was 45 years old, which means he has about 2 years remaining in the league.

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The legendary quarterback appeared to change his tune as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers did the Super Bowl Media Day car wash on Monday.

Brady told reporters he would “definitely” consider playing past 45.

“It’s a physical sport, and the perspective I have on that is that you never know when that moment is,” Brady said, via The Athletic. “It’s a contact sport, there’s a lot of training that goes into it. It has to be a 100 percent commitment from me to keep doing it.”

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Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady (12) runs with a elastic band around his legs during an NFL football workout Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021, in Tampa, Fla. The Buccaneers play the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl LV on Feb. 7. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)

ESPN reported last April that Brady had considered playing until 48.

Brady is 43 years old will be the oldest quarterback to start in a Super Bowl come Feb. 7 when the Buccaneers take on the Kansas City Chiefs. It will be his third Super Bowl appearance since he turned 40 years old – a mark no other quarterback has ever set.

Brady, with young and talented wide receivers around him, could possibly play later in his career. It will depend on how his body progresses with age and whether his training routine remains the same as he gets older.

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He signed a two-year contract with the Buccaneers and it’s looking likely he will play next season regardless of what happens on Feb. 7.

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