Robert Pattinson's The Batman Resumes Production After Star Reportedly Tested Positive for COVID-19

The Batman is back in action!

On Thursday, Entertainment Weekly reported that the superhero film, directed by Matt Reeves, has resumed production after halting the film shoot when star Robert Pattinson reportedly contracted the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). “Following a hiatus for COVID-19 quarantine precautions, filming has now resumed on The Batman in the U.K.," a spokesperson for Warner Bros. told the outlet.

Earlier this month, news broke that work on the anticipated movie was put on hold when Pattinson, 34, tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a source who spoke to Vanity Fair. The delay came just days after The Batman resumed production after initially shutting down due to the pandemic in March.

Warner Bros. did not confirm who on set was infected but did tell Vanity Fair in a statement at the time, "A member of The Batman production tested positive for COVID-19, and is isolating in accordance with established protocols. Filming is temporarily paused.”

The film stars Pattinson as Bruce Wayne, aka the Batman, in the character’s early years as a detective and vigilante. Paul Dano, Colin Farrell, Jeffrey Wright, Andy Serkis, John Turturro star as well, with Zoë Kravitz rounding out the cast as Catwoman.

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On Wednesday, Pattinson was spotted kissing girlfriend Suki Waterhouse on a park bench in London, where the couple lives together, in a rare instance of PDA for the two.

Pattinson and Waterhouse, 28, have been living through the pandemic together in London, where they've been spotted out and about since they were first linked in July 2018. Since then, the two have bonded more and are spending quality time together while adhering to the U.K. lockdown.

“They are very loved-up," a source previously told PEOPLE of the two. "They haven't been together that long, but everything seems on the fast track. They are always laughing and smiling at each other."

"It’s about the early days of him being Batman and he’s very far from being perfect," director Reeves said of his The Batman retelling during the DC Comics' FanDome event last month.

"One of the things that are interesting is learning how to be Batman. It's a criminological experiment. He's trying to figure out what he can do to change this place. He's seeing he's not having any of the effect he wants to have. That's when the murders start to happen … and it opens up a whole new world of corruption. Without being an origin tale, it ends up touching on his origins," he said.

"It's a detective story, a mystery, it's got, of course, action, and it's incredibly personal for him. He's kind of a growing legend and [criminals] are afraid of him. He's not a symbol of hope yet. One of the things he has to deal with is how he's perceived … What was exciting for me was not doing the origin [story] but to meet him in the middle and to see him make mistakes and grow and fail and be heroic in a way that felt very human and very flawed."

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