Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station on new map of the Northern Line

New Tube map is unveiled showing Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station on the £1.1billion Northern Line extension ahead of its official opening next week

  • Trains will begin arriving at the two new stops from around 5.30am on Monday 
  • TfL said estimated final cost of extending the line from Kennington is £1.1billion 
  • Power station to open next summer after being transformed into huge shopping, entertainment and office block 

Transport for London (TfL) has unveiled a map showing the two new stations on the Northern Line following the first major expansion of the Tube network since the late 1990s. 

Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station can now be seen attached to Kennington on the new extension, which will begin serving the new stops from around 5.30am on Monday.

It is the first major expansion of the London Underground since the opening of the extension of the Jubilee line from Green Park to Stratford in 1999.

Billions of pounds of investment have been pumped into the area in recent years, including through the redevelopment of Battersea Power Station and the building of a new US Embassy in Nine Elms.

The power station will open next summer after being transformed into a huge shopping, entertainment and office block – complete with more than 200 in-built apartments for the super-rich.  

TfL said the estimated final cost of extending the Northern line from Kennington is now around £1.1 billion.

The Greater London Authority borrowed £1 billion for the expansion, which will be funded through business rates from the local area and around £270 million of contributions paid by developers.

The new map (pictured) features the two new stations – Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station – which make up the Northern line extension in south London

The scheme takes the total number of Tube stations to 272.

Carl Painter, London Underground area manager responsible for the new stations, said: ‘There is a palpable air of excitement behind the doors in both of our state-of-the-art new stations as around 100 staff get ready to welcome customers from Monday.

‘London Underground stations have a long history of helping to define a neighbourhood’s identity, in gluing communities together, and providing a highly visible landmark that helps visitors to navigate.

‘We look forward to welcoming customers to the newest additions to the Tube network next week.’ 

The first train will leave Battersea Power Station at 5.28am on Monday and there will be an initial peak time service of six trains per hour on the extension, which will rise to 12 trains per hour by mid-2022.

Both new stations are in Zone 1 and Kennington has become a Zone1/2 station, to avoid penalising those using it as an interchange. 

It means customers going to and from central London will only pay a Zone 1 fare. 

The Battersea Power Station (pictured) will open next summer after being transformed into a huge shopping, entertainment and office block – complete with more than 200 in-built apartments for the super-rich

The exterior of the new US Embassy in the Nine Elms area of South West London

Circus West Village at Battersea Power Station, the newly opened residential and public centre in Battersea

Those travelling between Kennington and the city centre will also see their single pay-as-you-go fare reduced to £2.40, regardless of the time.

The fare zone change also means that those who travel from Kennington towards Balham, Tooting and Morden will also not pay any extra as a result of the extension to the 36-mile line, a TfL statement said earlier this year.

The Northern Line extension began in 2015 and was delayed three years ago due to ‘miscalculations’. 

It starts at Kennington and will terminate at the Grade II-listed Battersea Power Station, a decommissioned coal-fired plant owned by Malaysian investors.

The power station has undergone major redevelopment as the site of more than 100 retail shops, restaurants and cafes, including tech giant Apple’s new 500,000 sq ft London campus.

Eateries include Gordon Ramsay’s Street Pizza restaurant, No 29 Power Station West, Megan’s Battersea, Tapas Brindisa, Wright Brothers, Fiume, Battersea Brewery and Tonkotsu, while much of the station has been converted into 253 apartments with some costing as much as £8.2million.  

Andy Lord, Managing Director of London Underground, said in May: ‘The Northern Line Extension will open up a whole new area of the capital, bringing the Tube to this part of London for the very first time. 

Transport for London (TfL) announced that Kennington is changing from a Zone 2 to a Zone 1/2 station as apart of the Tube extension

The Northern Line extension began in 2015 and starts at Kennington and terminates at the Grade II-listed Battersea Power Station, a decommissioned coal-fired plant owned by Malaysian investors

‘As more people return to the transport network, changing Kennington to a Zone 1/2 station will benefit local residents, ensuring that they get the best value fare no matter which direction they are travelling in. 

‘The Northern Line Extension will provide vital sustainable transport links to thousands of residents and businesses in Battersea and the surrounding areas, helping reduce carbon and improving air quality, and we thank local residents in Kennington, Battersea and Nine Elms for their patience throughout the work.’

TfL is aiming to turn the 120-year-old Northern Line, which connects Barnet, Edgware and Morden with central parts of the capital and is in parts 200ft deep, into what it calls the ‘black diamond’ of London.

The extension was given the go-ahead in November 2014 by then Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin and construction began the next year. Tunnelling started in March 2017 and finished later that year.

It has periodically run into problems, and stopped completely amid the spread of coronavirus in March 2020. 

However, it returned three months later after implementing Covid-secure measures including social distancing.      

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