Rail strike LIVE – Latest UK updates as Jubilee line shuts, commuters warned & travel chaos batters Heathrow | The Sun

RAIL strikes are expected to cause the cancellation of about 80% of train services across Britain today.

Train travellers have been urged to stay at home unless absolutely necessary up and down the country after last ditch talks failed to resolve a dispute over pay, jobs and conditions.

Half the rail network will shut down today, Thursday and Saturday in the biggest walkout in 30 years, the RMT confirmed yesterday.

Meanwhile, the rush of commuters has led to the Jubilee line in London closing, while the Stanstead Express also sent a stark warning to commuters.

The train operator confirmed the last trains in East Anglia today, adding that there are "no trains if you miss the last train and no replacement buses".

And Heathrow airport is experiencing huge delays as a "massive traffic snarl" emerges at Terminal 3 parking area.

Huge queues have been building up this morning on the M4 Heathrow spur heading towards the airport in West London.

Read our rail strike 2022 live blog below for the latest updates…

  • henry moore

    When are the RMT rail strikes

    The UK is currently bracing itself for the biggest rail strike in 30 years, but when exactly will trains stop running?

    The RMT members are holding 24-hour strikes on three days:

    • Tuesday 21 June
    • Thursday 23 June
    • Saturday 25 June

    However, if the workers do not get what they have requested, we could see further strikes

    Travellers criticise 'disgraceful' taxi fares as demand surges amid rail strikes

    Travellers have criticised the "disgraceful" increase in taxi fares as demand surges during the nationwide rail strikes.

    Millions of people are suffering disruption from rail strikes with 80% of trains cancelled and a spike in road congestion.

    London Underground workers are also on strike on Tuesday.

    Those forced to travel are having to contend with skeleton train timetables, increased traffic on the roads and surging demand for alternative modes of transport.

    Uber users in London are being hit with a surge in prices with a three-mile journey from Paddington to King's Cross estimated to cost £19 just after midday – down from £27 at 8.45am.

    Elsewhere in London, Addison Lee taxis has had limited availability on Tuesday morning and travellers are having to pay a £5 surcharge for all journeys.

    Zipcar and black cabs are also experiencing higher demands but people will only have to pay the usual price for these services.

    MJ Shannon, a bar manager, said she had to take a £30 Uber taxi, instead of a local train service, from Hale, Cheshire, where she was at a training event, to get to Manchester Piccadilly before a train home to Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

    Ms Shannon said: "I'm trying to get back to Newcastle. It's not the worst inconvenience in the world, all the major lines are still running."

    RMT source admits strikes failing to have impact at Liverpool Street station

    An RMT source admitted that strikes were failing to have a major impact at Britain's third-busiest station as a number of lines kept running.

    At Liverpool Street, commuters flooded off Overground trains from Chingford and Enfield Town approximately every half an hour, most of them heading to the Central and Elizabeth lines.

    The union source said: "I think it's been more minor inconvenience than straight direct impact."

    A Pret a Manger, a Pure, and the International Cheese shop all remained closed, while The Savanna, a grocer's, left a notice apologising to customers for keeping its shutters up.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Volunteers making their way to Glastonbury DESPITE train strikes

      WaterAid is expecting 700 volunteers to arrive at Glastonbury today for vital work from loo cleaning, providing water at all the key water stations and recycling.

      And the volunteer army is determined to make it to Worthy Farm by all means necessary.

      Anna Hedges, Special Events Manager at WaterAid said: “The WaterAid volunteers have shown that where there is a will there is a way to Worthy Farm. We are expecting more than 700 volunteers to arrive today ahead of the Glastonbury Festival.

      "From the Loo Crew, clean-up group and to our water team we have seen the volunteers get inventive as to how they make it down to the site today.

      "From cycling to lift sharing the rail strike has given some of them the opportunity to meet their fellow volunteers before they arrive, use their ingenuity and begin the festival spirit early.”

    • Joseph Gamp

      Rail chaos sees spike in road traffic

      Millions of people are suffering disruption from rail strikes with 80% of trains cancelled and a spike in road congestion.

      Prime Minister Boris Johnson called on the public to "stay the course" after around 40,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Network Rail and 13 train operators walked out in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions.

      Only a fifth of trains are running on Tuesday and half of all lines are closed.

      Services are generally restricted to main lines, but even those are only open between 7.30am and 6.30pm.

      Much of Britain will have no passenger trains for the entire day, including most of Scotland and Wales, the whole of Cornwall and Dorset, and places such as Chester, Hull, Lincoln and Worcester.

      Usually busy stations such as London Euston and London Paddington are nearly deserted except for union picket lines.

      Many people are believed to be working from home rather than travelling to offices.

    • Joseph Gamp

      NHS worker says his staff in his sector 'aren't allowed to strike'

      A healthcare support worker in north London who was an hour and a half late for work amid the travel disruption has said NHS staff like him "aren't able to strike" like those from rail companies.

      David Raposo Buzon was waiting at a bus stop from 6.30am to make it in for his 7.30am scheduled start, but facing long queues and packed services he did not make it to his workplace until 9am.

      "I feel OK with people doing strikes, but at the same time I feel angry when I think that NHS workers are not able to strike even if our conditions at work are really bad," the 34-year-old, originally from Spain, told the PA news agency.

      "We aren't able to strike because we need to provide a minimum service but the service is already under minimum right now and, on the top of that, if you strike, people literally die, so you feel guilty and, at the end, don't do it."

      Mr Buzon shared footage of long queues waiting for a bus on his commute on Twitter, posting: "My patients and coworkers (are) still waiting for me because of the #RailStrikes.

      "And we are not allowed to strike. And my salary is totally worse than the ones that are striking. The country needs a change."

    • Joseph Gamp

      Rush hour hell as people trek to work by foot, bike and bus

      Rush-hour commuters in the UK faced chaos on Tuesday as railway workers launched the network's biggest strike in more than three decades, forcing people to trek to work on foot, by bike, bus — or simply not bother at all.

      The RMT rail union argues the strikes are necessary as wages have failed to keep pace with UK inflation, which has hit a 40-year high and is on course to keep rising.

      Last-ditch talks to avert the work stoppage broke down on Monday, meaning more than 50,000 RMT members will walk out for three days this week.

      Train and London Underground stations, normally a sea of people for the morning rush, were deserted or even locked, with just a skeleton service running on many networks across the country.

      Passengers were warned not to travel all week, with two more days of strike action scheduled for Thursday and Saturday wreaking havoc to schedules.

      In London, cab firms reported a surge in demand, while main roads were packed with buses and cars, and cyclists weaving in between.

      Long queues formed at bus stops on the outskirts of London shortly after 6:00 am, but many gave up as services carried on without stopping, already full.

    • Joseph Gamp

      In pictures: Bristol Temple Meads station DESERTED

      A few passengers are pictured waiting for Bristol Temple Meads train station to open.

      The station opened at 7am today due to the rail strikes, it normally opens at 4.30am.

      Today is the first of three national rail strikes that are likely to cripple the train network all week.

      A few passengers wait for Bristol Temple Meads train station to open. The station opened at 7am today due to the rail strikes, it normally opens at 4.30am.Credit: SWNS
    • Joseph Gamp

      Passengers SLAM 'outrageous' strikes

      Susan Millson, 69, from Clapham, southwest London, said the rail strikes are "outrageous" and "awful" as she was forced to cancel her trip to East Grinstead to see her sister for the day.

      Speaking at Clapham Junction station, Ms Millson said she had hoped that a train to East Grinstead might be running so she came to the station only to discover the services had been affected by the industrial action.

      Asked if she would find an alternative means of travel, she said: "It's not worth it. By the time you get there, you've got to think about getting back and who knows what is going to happen tomorrow. I know there isn't a strike but it's going to have a knock-on effect."

      On how she feels about her day being ruined, she said: "I just think it's outrageous that there is no give and take between the unions and the Government. No one is giving any leeway at the moment, it's awful, it's just awful.

      "It's a nice day as well," she added.

      "No one can afford to strike at the moment the way the country is, it's awful and now we've got this."

    • Joseph Gamp

      RMT invited to formal talks on July 1 to discuss working practices

      Network Rail (NR) has asked the biggest rail workers' union to attend formal consultation talks next month on introducing "modern working practices".

      A letter was handed to Mick Lynch, general secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT), at the end of talks on Monday evening.

      Meetings were held throughout the day but failed to avert three days of strikes by RMT members which crippled train services on Tuesday and will be repeated on Thursday and Saturday.

      The letter, written by Paul Rutter of NR, says: "We have always made clear to you that we needed to make material progress in these discussions and that we needed to implement meaningful changes to working practices by April 2023.

      "I am still hopeful that we can agree a way forward. We cannot, however, delay any longer and with that in mind we intend to consult formally with you on the implementation of changes to a number of working practices which we believe can be changed within the existing agreements and T&Cs (terms and conditions) under which our Maintenance and Works Delivery staff are employed.

      "We will also press ahead with consultation on the implementation of certain technologies in order to make the railway a safer and more efficient workplace.

      "Whilst we do not believe that we need the agreement from our trade unions to make these changes, we would much prefer to implement them with your agreement and co-operation."

    • Joseph Gamp

      PM urges passengers to 'stay the course' in face of crippling rail strikes

      Boris Johnson warned train passengers they must "stay the course" in the face of the "unnecessary aggravation" caused by rail strikes.

      The Prime Minister told a meeting of the Cabinet that reforms are vital for the rail industry and those who work in it.

      Millions of people are suffering disruption as only a fifth of trains are running on Tuesday and half of lines are closed.

      Services are generally restricted to main lines, but even those are only open between 7.30am and 6.30pm.

      Around 40,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Network Rail and 13 train operators have walked out in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions.

      Mr Johnson said: "I say this to the country as a whole, we need to get ready to stay the course.

      "To stay the course, because these reforms, these improvements in the way we run our railways are in the interests of the travelling public, they will help to cut costs for farepayers up and down the country."

    • Joseph Gamp

      NHS worker fears Glastonbury plans ruined by rail strikes

      An NHS worker from Liverpool has said he fears he will not be allowed into Glastonbury Festival after rail strikes hit his travel plans.

      Huw, who did not wish to share his second name, booked a coach ticket to Glastonbury in October 2019 before the event was later cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020.

      The 28-year-old patient-facing worker has since moved to Liverpool but his ticket requires him to travel via a festival-organised coach from Brighton at 7am on Wednesday.

      He does not finish work until 9pm on Tuesday and the final train from Liverpool to London is at 4pm, so he has now spent £70 on the earliest available bus to the festival on Thursday morning hoping he will be allowed entrance.

      "Festival tickets are given out on the coach, so there's a very real possibility that this rail strike means I can't actually get into the festival," Huw told the PA news agency.

      "I'm making my own way from Liverpool on Thursday morning and will be relying on the goodwill of the Brighton coach driver to hand my festival ticket over either to the box office or to my mates who'll meet me at the gate… hopefully common sense prevails."

    • Joseph Gamp

      In pictures: Packed Elizabeth Line train at London Ealing Broadway station

      Millions of people are suffering disruption as the largest rail strike for a generation cripples Britain's train services.

      Only a fifth of trains are running on Tuesday and half of lines are closed as around 40,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Network Rail and 13 train operators have walked out.

      Services are generally restricted to main lines, but even those are only open between 7.30am and 6.30pm.

      Usually busy stations such as London Euston are nearly deserted except for union picket lines.

      Passengers squeeze into a packed Elizabeth Line train at Ealing Broadway on the first day of three planned days of national rail strikes
    • Joseph Gamp

      Ashford International staff outnumbered passengers by 10 to one

      Staff outnumbered passengers by 10 to one at Ashford International station on Tuesday morning due to the rail strike.

      Staff were posted by the entrances and exits of the station, directing the few passengers where to go.

      At the normally bustling commuter hub with a frequent high-speed service into London, trains to the capital are running twice an hour.

      Most other services to locations such as Tonbridge, Ramsgate and Canterbury have been suspended.

      The Eurostar is running a reduced service but is passing straight through Ashford, as stops were suspended during the pandemic.

    • Joseph Gamp

      Several Labour MPs join RMT picket lines

      Several Labour MPs have joined RMT pickets to show their support for rail workers taking strike action on Tuesday morning.

      Ian Lavery, the MP for Wansbeck and former chair of the Labour Party, joined a picket in Morpeth, tweeting: "Solidarity with the @RMTunion today and all days."

      Beth Winter, the Labour MP for Cynon Valley, tweeted: "Complete solidarity with striking @RMTunion members today.

      "The Trades Unions are the organised working class… the workers united will never be defeated."

      Tahir Ali, the MP for Birmingham Hall Green, said he would be joining pickets later on Tuesday and posted: "Solidarity to all those who are out taking action to protect jobs, ensure safety, and win better pay and conditions."

    • Joseph Gamp

      National Rail Enquiries website crashes

      The National Rail Enquiries website has stopped working.

      Passengers attempting to use the service to find out what trains are running during the rail strike are being shown a message stating: "500 Internal Server Error".

    • Joseph Gamp

      Industrial action 'taking us back to days of union strikes' says Shapps

      Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said the industrial action on the railways is "taking us back to the bad old days of union strikes" as he vowed to "push on with these reforms anyway".

      He told Sky News: "I hear the unions say it's about pay, it's about job cuts, in fact there's a pay offer on the table and the job cuts are by and large voluntary.

      "So it's unnecessary, it's taking us back to the bad old days of union strikes and they've walked away now from the negotiations saying they're going to strike and calling off any chance of a resolution.

      "We're going to have to push on with these reforms anyway."

    • Joseph Gamp

      Stations left DESERTED as industrial action begins

      Train passengers are being hit by major disruption due to the largest strike by rail workers for a generation.

      Usually busy stations such as London Euston were nearly deserted except for picket lines by union members early today, with the start of services delayed until 7.30am.

      Even then only a fifth of services will run, half of lines will remain closed, and the network will be shut down at 6.30pm.

      Much of Britain will have no passenger trains for the entire day, including most of Scotland and Wales, the whole of Cornwall and Dorset, and places such as Chester, Hull, Lincoln and Worcester.

      Last-ditch talks failed to resolve the bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions, with all sides blaming each other for the lack of progress.

      Around 40,000 members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union at Network Rail and 13 train operators have walked out.

      People look at the departures board at Victoria Station, in London, Britain June 21, 2022. REUTERS/John Sibley
    • henry moore

      What trains will run in Scotland today?

      Tomorrow will see the UK hit with the biggest rail strike in 30 years.

      Some services will remain operational however.

      The BBC has listed which ones will run in Scotland.

      • Edinburgh – Glasgow via Falkirk High: two trains per hour
      • Edinburgh – Bathgate: two trains per hour
      • Glasgow – Hamilton/Larkhall: two trains per hour
      • Glasgow – Lanark: two trains per hour
      • Edinburgh – Glasgow via Shotts: one train per hour

      When are the RMT rail strikes

      The UK is currently bracing itself for the biggest rail strike in 30 years, but when exactly will trains stop running?

      The RMT members are holding 24-hour strikes on three days:

      • Tuesday 21 June
      • Thursday 23 June
      • Saturday 25 June

      However, if the workers do not get what they have requested, we could see further strikes

      Mass shortages

      Many train services have been cancelled with “shortage of train crew” given among the reasons ahead of a national walkout of rail workers.

      And a number of train companies are running emergency timetables today, warning people to only travel if necessary.

      But Treasury chief secretary Simon Clarke said earlier today it is likely the rail strike will go ahead and insisted it is not up to the Government to resolve the dispute.Edit

      • henry moore

        Last-ditch talks fail, strike will go ahead

        This afternoon, the RMT top brass met with rail bosses for last-ditch talks regarding tomorrow’s strike.

        These talks failed, meaning the strike will now go ahead.

        “We are moving on now to the next phase of this campaign,” Mick Lynch, the head of the RMT rail union, said.

      • henry moore

        Major strike could send UK back to the 70s

        Meanwhile, teachers, binmen and posties have threatened to join the walkout – causing chaos unseen since the 1970s.

        A reduced timetable this week will operate just 20 per cent of train services on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.

        And a map of misery has illustrated how just half of the country’s network will be open.

        Network Rail said that no passenger services will serve locations such as Penzance in Cornwall, Bournemouth in Dorset, Swansea in South Wales, Holyhead in North Wales, Chester in Cheshire and Blackpool, Lancashire.

        There will also be no passenger trains running north from Glasgow or Edinburgh.

      • henry moore

        RMT blames government for strike

        The RMT Union, which is set to plunge the nation into travel hell this week, has claimed the government are to blame for the strike.

        RMT General Secretary Mick Lynch said there would only be a solution if ministers gave workers the right to negotiate.

        “What we’ve come to understand is the dead hand of this government is all over this dispute. Until they allow these employers to negotiate freely I can’t see we’re going to get a resolution,” he said.

      • henry moore

        The strike is set to go ahead, here is TFL’s advice for avoiding it

        The UK is set to be plunged into travel CHAOS this week, as thousands of rail workers go on strike.

        TFL have been relatively quiet on the situation, but they have released a statement giving advice to weary travellers.

        Its advice? Simply avoid using London’s trains

        A TfL statement said: “We are advising customers to avoid travelling on Tuesday 21 June, when strike action will severely disrupt most of TfL’s and national rail’s services.

        “If you need to travel, you are advised to complete your journey by 18:00.

        “Disruption on all Tube lines will continue through the morning of Wednesday 22 June.

        “No London Underground services are expected to run before 08:00, when they will begin running with delays.

        “We encourage customers to avoid making journeys until mid-morning.”

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